Are you a follower or a fan?

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Follower vs. Fan. Is there a difference?

1. Followers are committed. Fans can be fickle.

2. Followers trust their leader. Fans trust in their leader only when it benefits them.

3. Followers want a vision. Fans want a show.

4. Followers ask “what have i done for you lately?” Fans ask “what have you done for me lately?”

5. Followers are in for the long term. Fans are in for the short term.

6. Followers have an intrinsic connection; it’s not about wearing a t-shirt. Fans have an extrinsic connection; it’s ALL about wearing a t-shirt.

7. Followers don’t care who gets the credit. Fans draw attention to themselves.

8. Followers want connection and community. Fans want an autograph and a selfie.

9. Followers believe that what they are part of is truly making a difference. Fans believe that what they are part of is simply making a memory.

Are you a follower or a fan?

50 Innovative and Usable phrases for Responding during the Sermon

Whatever your background, most communicators, whether a pastor, preacher, leadership speaker, motivational guru, youth leader, or vision caster, enjoy having people in the audience provide feedback. And not just telling someone after they’re done “good job,” but actual real time feedback. Verbal call and response feedback. Responding in the moment.

Some of you are used to this. Some of you don’t know anything different. And others of you have never experienced it. And probably some of you that are immediately thinking if anyone spoke up during our Sunday services that they would be immediately removed by the “bouncers,” otherwise known as the “ushers” and offering coordinators….!!

So I’m doing a bit more speaking these days, and I can verify that having people in the crowd agreeing with me and cheering me on and making some noise in response is a beautiful thing. It provides energy, inspiration, and definitely creates a connection with the audience/crowd. 

Now in the church I group up in, there were only a few folks who had “permission” to respond to the sermon on a Sunday morning, and they usually went with the traditional  “Amen” or “Hallelujah.” Which still work. Nothing against the traditional phrases. I’m a fan of the traditional phrases. 

Whatever your style, I want to suggest a NEW list of phrases that can be implemented into your church culture. Your leadership conference. Your youth gathering. Your Sunday morning experience.

A little more current, a little more edgy, and a little more innovative than the classics.

So here you go, 50 Innovative Phrases for Responding During the Sermon: 

1. Run that back

2. Hello!

3. Retweet

4. Hashtag it

5. Let em know

6. Jackpot

7. I know you didn’t (said like “I know you diiiiinnntttt”)

8. More of that

9. Go ahead

10. Bring it strong

11. Come on/Come on sir (or ma’am)

12. Bet you won’t

13. Double down

14.There it is

15. Take it

16. Buckets (or Bottoms)

17. Turn it up

18. Boom

19. Yahtzee

20. That’s Butter

21. Bingo

22. Hook. Line. Sinker.

23. So great/So good/That’s great/That’s good

24. Getchya some!

25. Bring it

26. Go ahead

27. Right on

28. That’s good pastor (or “great” inserted for “good”)

29. Hit em with it

30. Money

31. Double tap 

32. Burning/On Fire/Fire Alert/Coming in hot

33. Land that plane

34. Feed me/I’m Hungry

35. Worth a clap

36. Preach

37. Truth

38. Onions

39. Here we go

40. On point

41. Game over

42. You meddlin

43. Swish/Buckets

44. Right swipe that

45. Ride that bus

46. That dog will hunt

47. Put that on a plate and split it

48. Woooooo00

49. Whistle (literally just whistling!)

50. Uh huh or Uh oh 0r ah ha

** and a bonus- “Crickets”

 

How about you? What phrases would you add to the list? 

7 Keys to Celebrate your Rivals and Partner with your Competition

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Winning. Competition. Rivalry.

For all of us who are Type A Leaders, jealousy in the form of competition is always a struggle. You may call it something else (competitive spirit, goal-oriented, fast pace), but at the end of the day, we all struggle with being jealous or envious of others successes, especially when it is in the same industry, or same town, or same circle, or same customer base. In these cases, it feels like competition, and again for us Type A’s, when there is a competition, we ALWAYS want to win.

How do you view those you are “competing” against? Whether competing for attendees, or resources, or prestige, or members, or customers, understanding the proper posture towards your rivals is crucial to being a Collaborative Leader. Most leaders I know never get this right.

And in the faith community- whether a non profit ministry leader, pastor, church leader or, or parachurch organization director, this sense of competition and envy is rampant. Instead of jealousy and envy, collaboration and partnership should be the norm in the Church and faith-based community. We should be celebrating the pastor or leader across town, instead of finding ways to make them look bad or talking bad about them to others but making it look like we are bringing it up so as to “pray” for them.

Competition for customers, resources, time and money will always be a reality, but the question is how YOU deal with this. Jealousy is natural, but how you respond to it will prove your maturity as a leader. And as a follower of Christ, jealousy or envy is definitely not one of the fruits of the Spirit!

So, the best solution I’ve found to combating jealousy/envy and competition is Celebration. When you find yourself tempted to speak ill about a rival or you are secretly wrestling with envy/jealousy over someone else you are competing with, flip that emotion on its head.

1. Celebrate your competition. Your rivals. Whether the leader or the organization overall.

2. Speak positively about them. In public. and in private.

3. Encourage the leader or leaders of that “rival” organization. Send them cards or notes, call them, and even visit.

4. Look for the good in what they are doing and celebrate that.

5. Pray for them, both in public and in private.

6. Lean into them, and seek opportunities to partner together in your community or industry.

7. The question you should be asking is, “how can I help this person win?” Church leaders- we’re all on the same team. We’re fighting the same fight. Let’s act like it.

Young Influencers List, January edition

Here you go, the January edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s lists here.

1. Liz Bohannon- Portland based founder of Sseko Designs, an ethical fashion brand that works to educate and empower women.

2. Brady Toops- Nashville based singer, songwriter and worship leader. Check out his Free EP.

3. Sofia Dickens- West coast correspondent for Hollywood Heat on TruTV, and former host of Channel One news.

4. Joshua GagnonNew England based communicator, leader and pastor of Next Level Church.

5. Kathleen ShannonOklahoma City based storyteller, designer, creator, blogger, and founder of Braid Creative.

6. Zakiya JacksonGrand Rapids based speaker, author, board advisor for CCDA, and currently writer with DeVos Urban Leadership Initiative and Collected Young Minds.

7. Chris Hogan- speaker, entrepreneur, thought leader and chief strategist for Retirement, Business and Leadership for Dave Ramsey.

7 Characteristics of Good Employees

in leadership,Leadership Rules.

Here you go, 7 keys on Monday to help you be a better employee, partner, or peer to others in your organization.

1. write everything down- never show up to a meeting without something to write with and something to write on. And write it down. Everything. Otherwise you’ll forget. I don’t care who you are.

2. honor people’s time- show up early and finish on time. Actually finish early if at all possible.

3. come with solutions, not just ideas- this is crucial. move towards completion, not away from it.

4. learn how to anticipate- always be one step ahead. Do something every day you weren’t “asked” or “told” to do, but know you should do.

5. be a disciplined learner- understand it’s your role to be an expert, no matter what level or role you play in an organization. Don’t just be one step ahead of your boss in being skilled at your job…. be an expert.

6. create corporate culture, don’t just consume it- help set the standard in your organization, don’t just reflect it. Be a thermostat, not a thermometer.

7. be a servant- much harder said than done. Much of this perspective comes from having a great attitude.

20 Characteristics of an ALL IN Leader

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Are you a leader who is “ALL IN?”

I want leaders on my team who are “all in.” Coaches want players who are “all in” on their teams. Every organization out there wants employees and team members who are “all in.”

Being ALL IN as a leader means:

1. You don’t constantly look at the clock, and you’re not punching a time card. Your role is not defined by 9 – 5.

2. You get it done no matter how long it takes. You are “managerless,” meaning no one else has to worry about whether you are getting it done.

3. You realize you are part of something bigger than yourself, and humbly accomplish the goals because of a larger motivation than just you.

4. Giving just the “minimum” amount of effort required to get by without “getting in trouble” doesn’t even cross your mind.

5. Your hard work and excellence is done with pure motives. You are not worried about climbing the ladder or impressing anyone.

6. We is much more important than me. If I win, the team wins. If the team wins, I win.

7. You are willing and motivated to improve daily. Getting better at what you do is not a choice, it’s a requirement.

8. You maintain a high standard of excellence because the team/organization/brand demands it. You don’t want to let anyone else down on the team.

9. The vision compels you to greatness. Not the opposite- “your greatness compelling the vision.” Many leaders get this backwards.

10. Your intentions and goals are clear. I know what I’m getting, you know what you’re providing, and there’s never any concern about any alterior motives.

11. You are trustworthy. 100%. Always with no exceptions. I know I can count on you. You are dependable.

12. You have a constant pursuit of the extraordinary, not ordinary. Constant pursuit of unusual, not usual. Constant pursuit of being the best, not average.

13. You finish. Get the job done. Take projects across the finish line. Make things happen. On your own. When given an assignment, the leader can be assured it will get done with you working on it.

14. You build and create culture, not just consuming or reflecting it. You are part of building the positive atmosphere of the team.

15. You maintain a positive and encouraging environment. No gossip. You criticize in private, and praise in public. You fight and call out cynicism wherever you see it.

16. You anticipate. You understand what needs to be done next before having to be told, and are always looking for ways to make the process better.

17. You implement and live out the vision. You are a vision copycat. Taking on, embodying, and living out the vision and mission of the organization and the leader, helping set and model a cultural standard.

18. You always appropriately challenge those around you and above you. You make your leader and your leaders better. You push the leader, and know how to lead up appropriately and intentionally.

19. You are self aware, and lead yourself first. Your level of authenticity is congruent with your level of ambition and drive. The real you is constantly on display. You don’t need to be managed, and aren’t needy.

20. You are principled. The triple threat of humble, discipline and complete integrity. What you see is what you get. You know it’s not about you. You realize you aren’t “the answer.”