Young Influencers List, October edition

Here you go, the October edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s lists here.

1. Colony House- new rock band out of Nashville, and a strong connection to Steven Curtis Chapman!!

2. Molly Smith- movie producer, co-founder of Black Label Media, and the producer behind films like The Good Lie and Blindside.

3. Preston Miller- Chicago based hip hop choreographer, dancer and founder of United Artists Initiative.

4. Salomon Ligthelm- filmmaker, videographer, and overall talented creative designer and director, and c0-writer of the song “Oceans.”

5. Francesca Battistelli- Grammy nominated singer, songwriter, and artist.

6. James Vore- Atlanta native and content maven for Catalyst, marketing project manager on Catalyst Leader book, door holder and choir member for Passion.

7. Brian Kortovich- pro basketball player and NYC Rucker League standout. And founder of charity Aces in Action.

Young Influencers List, September edition

Here you go, the September edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s editions here.

1. Journey Smollett-Bell- LA based actress, best known for playing Jess on the hit show Friday Night Lights.

2. Brian Carpenter- founder of Refuge Foundation in Billings, MT, an incredible fishing and hunting leadership ministry.

3. Trevor Knight- current quarterback of my beloved Oklahoma Sooners!

4. Jessica Honneger- founder and chief dreamer of Austin based Noonday Collection, a clothing and jewelry org that is creating economic impact for the vulnerable around the world

5. Jeremy Walls- SVP and Chief Revenue Officer for the Miami Dolphins of the NFL.

6. Noah Gundersen- Seattle based singer/songwriter.

7. Anna Carroll- abolitionist and executive director of Lightforce International, restoring hope to men and women removed from the commercial sex industry.

4 Ways Leaders Can Release Control, and Ultimately Thrive :: Guest Post

(from Cole NeSmith)
I love control. We love control. Control and leadership are actually very fine lines. I started writing my new book, Spiritual Innovation, in 2013 and very quickly I discovered that control is at the root of so much of what I do on a daily basis in my life and leadership. I suspect the same is true for you.
At the heart of Spiritual Innovation is the reality that God is infinite, and throughout history, He has revealed more of Himself and His activity to and through His people. God (being the same today, yesterday and forever) is still up to revealing Himself in the most unexpected ways. But the greatest enemy to joining God in what He’s doing is our own desire for control : controlling ourselves, our circumstances, those around us, and – ultimately – controlling God.
In chapter two of Spiritual Innovation, I tell this story about how the desire to control manifested in my life as a leader.
As a kid, I did chores—cleaned the toilet, mowed the yard, dusted my bedroom. The payment for chores was allowance. Each time I did a chore, I ran up to my parent’s bedroom, opened the bedside table and pulled out a white pad of paper with a long running ledger of plus and minuses, earnings and payouts. Most Sundays, I would run up to that ledger, pull it out, move the decimal point one place to the left and determine the 10% tithe I was to put in the pink envelope with my church’s logo printed on it.
So, 15 years later in life, as I was preparing to give a message about “generosity” at my church, naturally I started researching the tithe. The tithe was mentioned in the books of Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. It was an agricultural offering of one tenth of one’s grain, wine, and oil harvests. But continuing on in my preparation, it became obvious: tithe was only one example of sacrificial giving in the Bible.
In Luke 19, Zacceaus, as a result of his encounter with Jesus, gave away half of his possessions and returned four times the amount he had stolen from individuals. When Jesus encounters the Rich Young Ruler in Matthew 19, Jesus instructs him to give away everything he has and come follow him. In Acts, we see members of the Church giving away all they had and giving to others as they had need. Even Ananias and Sapphira—after selling their field—were told the money they had received was at their disposal.
So why the ten percent? I think it’s because we like control and formulas give us the illusion of control. Encouraging people into a place of freedom takes control away. As individuals, we feel at ease when we know the expectation and can, without thought, meet that expectation. We ask, “what will make God happy with me?” and work to meet the minimum requirement so we can feel at ease. Then, as leaders, if we reinforce ten percent, that gives us a common, consistent message and a sense of peace that we will receive at least that much. But no one needs to be in relationship with God to understand this ten percent rule. The tither need not listen to God for instruction on giving, and the leader need not listen for how to lead his or her people or trust in God for provision.
So here are 4 ways I explore in the book that we as leaders can release control, and become the leaders we are created to be.

1. Platform People
In our desire to control, we often leverage people to achieve our own agenda. But the true role of a leader is not to use others but to platform them into their created purpose. This means that the initiatives of our churches may change over time as the people of our churches grow, mature, come, and go. So often, we create positions and push people into the holes to fill the void. But perhaps we should be creating positions not based on our own agenda but on God’s agenda as He blesses the people of our churches with specific gifts and talents.
2. Celebrate Uniqueness 
In order to platform people into their gifts, we must first begin to value people for their uniqueness. So much of modern, American Evangelicalism is built on the concept of sameness, and often “different” scares us. But as we step into relationship with God, he doesn’t neutralize the personalities and personas of each individual. God makes us each with unique gifts and talents to contribute to the unfolding of His plan of heaven on earth. It’s the role of the leader to help uncover the uniqueness of the people around us and to encourage, challenge, and equip them to step into the fullness of who they are created to be.
3. Embrace Exploration
Too many leaders settle to recreate. Too many of us are okay with trying to replicate what we’ve seen someone else do at some other place or at some other time. But God wants to accomplish something unique to where you are. Here and now. That means we have to become people of risk. We have to be people who are willing to explore the unknown depths of God and ministry, placing our complete trust in Him. It means we have to be willing to try things that may fail. But it’s in the exploration that we discover God in more intimate ways than ever before.
4. Practice Creativity 
If you’ve ever made something, you’ve practiced creativity. If you’ve ever asked, “how could this be different” or “how could we do this better,” you’ve practiced creativity. You see, creativity is central to the Christian life. Everything we are called to involves not only seeing things as they are but as they could be. God calls us to be people of hope who see the world as He sees it. And as we release our need for control, we begin participating in making the world, not what we think it should be, but what God has always intended it to be.
Life seems so much easier when we’re in control. But when things are up to you and me, they are limited to the confines of our human capacity. And God’s dreams for the world are so much bigger than anything we could ever accomplish on our own. So today, release control, step into an expectation of innovation, and see God do things far beyond anything you’ve ever imagined!
Cole NeSmith is the Creative Director and co-pastor of City Beautiful Church in Orlando, FL. His new book, Spiritual Innovation, helps us move from the need for control to a new level of exploration, expectation, discovery, and creativity in our faith and lives. Get it here.

He also creates interactive and reflective art and worship experiences through his company, Uncover The Color.

He blogs at colenesmith.com and is on Twitter @ColeNeSmith.

Young Influencers List, August edition

Here you go, the August edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s lists here.

1. Andy Mineo- NYC based hip hop artist, songwriter, producer and performer; part of the Reach Records family.

2. Heather Stevens- co-leader of “The Church and It’s 20 Somethings” project. And daughter of Tim Stevens…!!

3. Jerry Shen- co-founder of ELEO Conference, entrepreneur, creator of Fantasy Monster, and director of Engineering for Yahoo Fantasy Sports.

4. Thomas Lake- Atlanta based senior writer for Sports Illustrated.

5. Jeff Shaw- director of Out of Darkness, an anti human trafficking ministry, part of the Atlanta Dream Center.

6. Erika Kraus- founder of Haiti Transformed, and relief and development director at Antioch Community Church in Waco, TX, as well as Acts of Mercy International.

7. Brooklyn Lindsey- youth speaker, author, and youth/Saturday night campus pastor at Highland Park Church in Lakeland, FL

Tips for 1st Time in a Meeting

We’ve all been there. First time in a one on one meeting with your boss. First time in a brainstorming session. First time in a staff meeting. Whether your 1st meeting ever as a young intern, newly hired greenie, or seasoned pro who is new to the team, there are some keys to how you should approach the environment of a 1st time meeting.

1. Don’t try to be the expert. Reality is, you’re probably not. Make others in the room around you the expert.

2. Ask lots of questions. This is your entry point for any meeting, at any level. Good questions give you instant credibility. And many times are more strategic than the right answer.

3. Don’t feel like you have to give any answers. While asking good questions, don’t feel the need to provide answers in response.

4. Be curious and engaging. Look people in the eye. Engage with everyone around the table and in the room. Encourage others ideas.

5. Take a posture of learning. Take notes. Act like you’re in class. Be the most interested.

6. Get coffee. Or drinks. Or snacks. This shows you are okay with serving everyone else. Whether young or old, you’ve never too old or young to wait on others.

7. Act like you don’t belong, but work like you do. This is a good rule for any meeting, and your overall leadership in general.

9 Ways Your Leadership Should be Social

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It’s imperative that you are “social” in your leadership and influence today. A new reality exists, and as leaders we have to be not only aware of this, but also willing to jump in and embrace a new reality of Social engagement like never before.

Here are a few thoughts on Social Leadership:

1. Social Media = Influence. Bloggers, Tweeters, Facebookers, and Social media junkies are now the normal outlets to tap into for getting the word out. I’ve seen this the last few years with everything from new movies to new books to new conferences. These leaders are being sought out not just for their networks, but also for their endorsements. It’s a new era. Exponential influence in ways never seen before is happening through blogging, tweeting, instagramming, facebooking, pinteresting, etc. Digital mavens are shaping what we are listening to, reading, watching, and learning.

2. Social Entrepreneurs= A new wave of leaders has emerged. Leaders who combine business savvy with charitable endeavors and social innovation. Scott HarrisonCharles LeeBlake MycoskieJamie TworkowskiLaura Waters Hinson, Eugene ChoJeff ShinabargerKohl Crecelius and Jason Russell just to name a few.

3. Social Accountability- Leaders are constantly being evaluated in todays culture. You can’t hide anymore behind a position or title. Leaders are being held to a standard never seen before because of constant media- video, flip cameras, blogging, twitter. Your leadership has constant real-time evaluation. Especially well-known leaders. And Authenticity is crucial. Being honest, genuine and real is important for continual influence.

4. Social Good- it’s now in vogue to “do good.” And society in general is taking notice. Celebrities gain more influence because of causes they’re involved in. Businesses are “doing good” and focusing on the triple bottom line, which is now a normal measurement of success in business. Meaning what was our “gift back to society” and how did we “leave the world a better place.” It’s not just about making a profit anymore.

5. Social Politics in organizations is fading- Positional leadership doesn’t really matter anymore. Not about what position or title you hold, but more about what you are delivering. If you are executing and getting things done and creating value for the organization, your influence will have impact.

6. Creating a social “community” is now a norm, not an exception. A great example of this is Zappos, and the kind of culture that Tony Hsieh has created there. Employees enjoy being around each other, and take pride in a sense of family that exists within their company.

7. Flattening of the “social hierarchy of influence.” I can learn from all kinds of great leaders in todays culture, and not know them personally. I can also connect with well known leaders much easier than in the past through technology and social platforms. Information and inspiration has never been so readily available to us. When you follow someone on Twitter, you feel like you know them personally, even if they have hundreds of thousands of other “followers.”

8. Social Justice is not just a fad. Connected to #4, but my opinion is that especially within the Church/faith community, this shift towards the “living out” of the Gospel through justice and mercy is here to stay.

9. A new generation of employees expect a “social workplace.” This is a Reality of a new generation, according to Tim Elmore is his great book Generation iY :

Experiential- all about the 5 senses. Sensory engagement is critical and a reality in terms of what Millenials have grown up with and desire.

Participatory- want an experience to be customized. Millenials have grown up in a participatory culture. They don’t just listen, but actually want to participate. This is very important in terms of creating a work environment/team culture that is attractive to 20 somethings.

Image-Rich- all about pictures, video, large screens, large TV’s, high res pics on your phone, etc. Pictures/video are an incredibly powerful learning medium for Millenials, vs. just text. Especially in terms of memory.

Connected- information is constant for Millenials. Text, facebook, twitter, phone, email. This can be both a positive and a negative.

12 Churches under the Radar you should Know

Here are a few churches with lots of influence in their communities, and definitely worth checking out in terms of the way they are doing ministry and reaching their cities. But may not be as well known to other leaders around the country.

Check them out, and add any other churches to the comments section that might be under the radar but we should make sure and know about.

1. Reality Church- San Francisco; Dave Lomas

2. Fresh Life ChurchKalispell, MT; Levi Lusko

3. Cornerstone Church- Orangeburg, SC; Artie Davis

4. The Crossing Church- Las Vegas, NV; Shane Philip

5. South Bay ChurchSan Jose, CA; Andy Wood

6. The Church of Eleven22- Jacksonville, FL; Joby Martin

7. The Church at ArkansasFayetteville, AR; Jonathan Beasley

8. Liquid Church- Mountainside, NJ; Tim Lucas

9. Epiphany Fellowship Church- Philadelphia, PA; Eric Mason

10. Hillside Community Church- Rancho Cucamonga, CA; Aaron McRae

11. The Triumphant Church- Hyattsville, MD; Perrin Rogers

12. Substance Church- Minneapolis, MN; Peter Haas

 

Young Influencers List, July Edition

Here you go, a brand new July edition of the YOUNG INFLUENCERS LIST. You can see all the past months lists here.

1. Sarah Dubbeldam – owner and Editor in chief of Darling Magazine, a great lifestyle magazine for women.

2. Charles Best - former public school teacher, now founder and CEO of Donors Choose, an innovative and revolutionary charity focused on teachers and schools.

3. Roxanne Stone – VP of Publishing at the Barna Group, former editorial director at Relevant Magazine.

4. Ben Prescott - campus pastor of Free Chapel Orange County, and formerly with PlanetShakers in Australia.

5. Christena Cleveland – speaker, writer, reconciliation expert, social psychologist, and author of Disunity in Christ.

6. Gareth Gilkeson and Ali Gilkeson – married front man and front woman, leading the Northern Ireland worship band Rend Collective, and transplants to Atlanta!