8 Ways to get Un Stuck

in leadership,Leadership Rules. No Comments

Sometimes we just feel stuck. Not that anything is really wrong, but more the sense that we’re not going anywhere. That place where you sense that things are okay, but not great. Where it seems like you are just going through the motions. Dependable and reliable, yes. Consistent, absolutely.

But not necessarily bringing your A-game.

I know the feeling. For me, this usually happens after an event is over. About 10 days-two weeks later. I usually just feel stuck at that point. I have a hard time being creative, being intentional, getting things done, moving the ball forward, and making decisions. I feel like I’m walking in knee deep mud at these points.

Another time of the year many of us feel stuck is mid winter. For you it could be late summer, or just after a big project has been completed.

If so, here are a few things to do:

1. Get out of your “normal” routine. Break up your schedule. Go on a trip. Visit someone you’ve wanted to see for quite a while. Hang out with people you don’t know but want to learn from. The key on this is break up your “normal” with something that is out of place, out of context, or just simply breaks up the rhythm. Makes you see things from a different vantage point. For me, when I travel, it usually “unsticks” me.

2. Go back to the Basics. Sports teams will go back to the basics to get out of a rut. In football it’s back to “blocking and tackling” or  in basketball it’s back to “passing, dribbling, and shooting.” For you, this could mean a number of things, but in essence, returning to the foundations of what you do, why you do it, and how you are uniquely designed to be doing what you are doing.

3. Jump on the Inspiration train. When I get stuck, I usually take time to find some stories of inspiration, read some emails, watch some videos, and allow myself to be re-inspired and re-energized. Jump on the TED website and search for some inspirational talks.

4. Talk with someone who motivates you. I also like to make sure I find some time to spend on the phone or in person with people who inspire me, because they usually can pull me out of my funk that I’m in. Make sure you have some people in your life who are motivators and inspiration icons- when you are around them it just fires you up. Could be a friend, a boss, a mentor, or someone you don’t know well. For me, I’ll call Bob Goff. If you know Bob, you know what I mean!

5. Keep it simple stupid. Kiss. Figuratively, not literally…! Start a new to do list with no more than 5 things on it. Get those done. Then move on to the next 5 things to do. Don’t overwhelm yourself with a to do list that is unachievable and not reachable. Focus on simplicity and clarity.

6. Hang around kids. Whether your own kids or someone else’s. Children have a way of providing inspiration because of their imagination, childlike faith, and sense of amazement at everything.

7. Exercise. Take a run, go swimming, work out, climb a mountain, jump on a bike, water ski, play basketball, or whatever activity fits you.

8. Lean into your passions. Might be that you deeply love music. Listen to your favorite songs. Might be that you love sitting on the beach. Could be hanging at your favorite cabin in the mountains. Or maybe you like to work on cars or tinker with inventions. Whatever your passions are, lean back into them.

12 Tips to Help You be a Better Speaker and Communicator

1. End on time. So simple, but so hard for so many speakers I know.

2. Don’t ask if people can hear you. They can. And if they can’t, the sound guys will turn up your microphone. This is incredibly distractive.

3. Avoid open ended questions with your audience. Those can be incredibly awkward if no one responds. For example, “are you fired up?” If no one answers, or even one person, you’re off to an awkward start!

4. Always thank your host or sponsor. It creates connection, and also shows that you are actually aware enough to know who’s behind the event or gathering you’re part of.

5. Make room for questions. Not always an option, but anytime you can create a conversation with those you are speaking to, that’s a good thing.

6. Don’t read your slides. I can read your slide. You don’t need to.

7. Never throw the production or front of house or audio team under the bus. This is a cardinal rule.

8. Tell stories. Be personable. Stories create connection and vulnerability. Stories fill in the gap between you as the expert and everyone else as the wanna bee’s.

9. Be authentic. If you aren’t funny, don’t try to be. Be real and who you truly are. Approachability is crucial.

10. Always have a call to action. Leave those in attendance with something to go work on. The point is to Change and Do Something!

11. Look people in the eye. Whether it’s 10 people or 10,000 people, eye contact is imperative.

12. Be passionate. Your level of passion will give permission to the audience to lean in with you. Move towards Heart and soul, and emotional intelligence. Leave it all on the field! Make sure you create emotional hooks, and take people on a roller coaster instead of a train when it comes to passion level. Trains are good for sleeping on….!

Young Influencers List, April edition

Here you go, the April edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s editions here.

1. FEDEL- real name Anthony Flagg, hip hop artist, rapper, spoken word poet, and speaker from Tulsa.

2. Jay Argaet- art and global communications director at Hillsong Church in Sydney. Great instagram follow!

3. Hannah Brencher- founder and creative director of More Love Letters, along with a blogger. Featured on TED, Oprah and elsewhere.

4. Shannon McNevan- founder and executive director of Republic Live and Boots and Hearts Festival, the largest country music festival in Canada.

5. Harvest Parker- songwriter, artist, and worship leader at Vintage 242 Church.

6. Gideon Tsang- serving pastor at Vox Veniae Church in Austin, TX and one of the directors of Space 12.

7. Amy Jones- executive director of Wedgwood Circle, based in DC.

Great Leaders are committed to the Insignificant

in leadership,Leadership Rules. 1 Comment

As Leaders, we live for the moment.

The big moments that are memory makers. The home runs. The winning “touchdown.” The deal that launches our organizations or business to the next level.

The significant benchmarks in life that define us and shape us. The times that people will talk about for years to come. When the adrenaline is dialed up and we step in.

But ultimately, faithfulness looks most like being disciplined and faithful to the small things in life and leadership.

Great leaders are committed to the Insignificant.

The making of a leader takes time, and I believe is revealed and refined through the continual steadfastness in the small things.

Our character, our sense of who we are, is defined by the insignificant points in life when no one is watching, when no one really cares. The times when it doesn’t seem to matter. The points where it is difficult to actually finish the project. The pain points when we wonder is this what God has actually called me to do. The moments when it would be okay to cut corners but we stay committed to excellence.

This is where the foundation of faithfulness and our character as leaders is created and solidified. Jesus describes this in Luke 16:10 “He who is faithful in a very little thing is faithful also in much; and he who is unrighteous in a very little thing is unrighteous also in much.” Be faithful to the small things.

Perseverance is crucial to being a disciplined leader. Staying true to the process. There is beauty in the process, and we are shaped by the journey.

The process defines us. No overnight transformation. No shortcuts. It takes years to be shaped into the leader God has called you to be. The nitty gritty daily grind of walking steadfastly in the mundane and ordinary that shapes the extraordinary.

Great leaders are always growing, learning & moving forward. It’s a journey, not a destination. Effective leaders never stop growing and getting better. They are curious, committed, and coachable. Always a student and desperate to learn.

And committed to making the small things, the seemingly insignificant projects and assignments that no one seems to care about, the best they can possibly be.

Stay committed to the insignificant!

8 Ways to Honor Your Leader

Leading is not easy. And it’s even more difficult if those on your team aren’t equipped well to follow.

We all have leaders that we work with, for and around. And every leader I know values being honored and respected. Honor is a really big thing. And incredibly important as it relates to being part of a team.

And especially relevant to young leaders, many of whom are working for leaders who are older than them.

Here are some ways to honor your leaders:

1. Pray - a huge one. Pray for wisdom, for clarity, for compassion and for a clear vision for your leader and leaders.

2. Encourage- lift your leaders up in public, and critique them in private. Tell them how you appreciate them. Consistently. Write them a note. Pour into them.

3. Confront- if you see something out of whack, tell them. Most leaders crave input and feedback, so give it to them. Push back on their ideas and convictions when appropriate. Confrontation works best though when encouragement and service and trust have been given freely for a long time. Confront in moderation.

4. Serve- be willing to carry the load. Get things done. Deliver more than you were asked to do. Be action oriented. Anticipating is a great way to honor. Figure out what needs to get done before your leader has to tell you.

5. Trust- incredibly important. Follow them. Put stock in the fact that they have your best interests in mind. Fight against sarcasm and cynicism.

6. Understand- know what drives them, what motivates them, and also what frustrates them. Lean into the things that motivate them, and avoid the things that frustrate them.

7. Protect- always have their back. Stand up for them. If you hear something negative, fight it. Sometimes we actually find misguided joy in ganging up on our leaders in order to make ourselves look and feel better. Avoid this.

8. Release- give your leader permission to lead you. Lean in. Have a posture of humility, respect, and openness to follow them. Open hearts and open minds, vs closed thoughts, arms crossed, and a made up mind.

8 Ways to Empower Your Team

Leaders: one of the key things you must ALWAYS do is empower your team. As I’ve learned over the years, most leaders at their core are control freaks, which is part of the reason they are successful. But we all must learn and recognize the need to empower those around us to succeed and do what they do well. Most leaders think they can do it all on their own, and many try, but ultimately in order to grow a successful organization that outlives you, as the leader, you have to empower those around you.

Here are a few thoughts on Empowering your Team:

1. Give them the opportunity to make decisions, and don’t second guess them. A lot of us as leaders are willing to allow our team members to make decisions, but want to step in as soon as we see something done differently than we would do. Don’t make that mistake. It is totally demoralizing to your team. Believe me, I know from experience!!

2. Assign them responsibility by them owning key projects from START to FINISH. So once we allow team members to make key decisions, now we have to allow them to own projects and feel the responsibility of completion.

3. Give them Freedom combined with Accountability. Freedom without accountability can lead to a great place to work with nothing getting done. Accountability without Flexibility can lead to a terrible place to work with things getting done but everyone hating their job. These have to work together.

4. Fight for them. Whether it’s standing up for them to your boss, or standing beside them and supporting them in a disagreement with a vendor, always take the stance of fighting for them and being willing to go to battle for them.

5. Encourage them. This is the one we so often forget. I know I do. I tend to keep pushing without stopping to say thanks. But encouragement can go the furthest in creating team chemistry, longevity, and commitment. Reward them with small gifts, extra unexpected bonuses, cards, etc. Be unexpected in your thankyous. Hand them out without bias. No one has ever been too much of a true encourager!

6. Counsel, coach and instruct. Not necessarily the same as encouragement. Great coaches do this well. They scream at you and make you better, while also putting their arm around you and giving you “ego biscuits” when needed. Two different parts of empowering, but both equally important. Instruction is key for releasing again and again, and assigning more responsibility.

7. Overwhelm them. Not on a continual basis, but ultimately your team members should constantly feel a bit overwhelmed by the projects or assignments they are working on, not underwhelmed. Many of their projects should cause them to feel like they are not prepared or ready. If they feel underwhelmed, they will probably end up looking elsewhere for greater assignments and more responsibility.

8. Give them permission. Permission to take risks, to fail, to represent your organization to others, take on responsibility and stewardship, and many other things. But ultimately give them permission to push back. Give them permission to call you out as the leader (appropriately, of course). Give them permission to argue and fight for their idea, even when it looks like it’s directly competing with your idea as the leader. Permission to push back. This does wonders.

Young Influencers List, March Edition

Here you go, the March edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s editions here.

1. David Wise- pro skier and gold medal winner in recent Sochi Olympics half pipe freestyle skiing.

2. Taya Smith- vocalist with Hillsong United and Young and Free, and angelic voice on the uber hit song “Oceans.”

3. Russell Okung- starting left tackle on Seattle Seahawks NFL team, and former Oklahoma State standout (don’t hold that against him!).

4. Andy Birdsong- manager of Basketball operations for the Atlanta Hawks.

5. Jay Pathak- senior pastor of Mile High Vineyard in Denver, CO, and c0-author of The Art of Neighboring with Dave Runyon.

6. Melinda Doolittle- singer, songwriter, author ,and 3rd place finalist on season Six of American Idol.

7. Ben Nockels- founder of 111 Project, mobilizing the Church to respond to the orphan crisis in the state of Oklahoma.

To “don’t Do’s” as a Young up and Coming Leader

For young leaders who are “up and comers,” here are a few things to NOT DO as you continue to gain influence, responsibility and authority.

DON’T DO THESE:

1. Believe that you are “the answer.”

2. Stop honoring those who’ve laid the groundwork before you.

3. Write off all the folks who finally helped you “arrive,” who might suddenly seem insignificant or unimportant.

4. Remove yourself from reality by surrounding yourself with “handlers” and those only interested in being “yes” men and women.

5. Believe the hype and regard yourself as crucial, and ultimately more important than all others, in connection to the success of the organization or project.

6. Adopt a scarcity mindset, believing that everything is a zero sum game.

7. Lose the passion for collaboration and partnership, whether in your community, or industry, or network.

8. Become cynical and pessimistic at every turn.

9. Stop “dating” your spouse and intentionally building into your closest friendships.

10. No longer see learning as a priority since you now know everything.

DON”T DO THESE.