11 New Books I Highly Recommend

Here are a few new leadership books from friends that I highly recommend:

1. Yes or No- by Jeff Shinabarger

2. Unstoppable- by Christine Caine

3. Row for Freedom- by Julia Immonen

4. The Best Yes- by Lysa TerKeurst 

5. Overrated- by Eugene Cho

6. Be the Message- by Kerry Shook 

7. Jesus Prom- by Jon Weece

8. Addicted to Busy- by Brady Boyd

9. Life with a Capital L- by Matt Heard

10. The Sticky Faith Guide For Your Family- by Kara Powell

11. Life on Mission- by Aaron Coe 

One of the Key Questions Smart Leaders Obsess Over

Succession Planning- a key area that smart leaders are thinking about and planning for.

One day your church will need a new pastor. One day your organization will need a new president. One day your charity will need a new executive director. Are you ready?

Whether you are a pastor, church staff, CEO or volunteer, you need to be thinking about the most important turning point your church or organization will have to face…who will lead when our current pastor/leader isn’t around anymore?

Many church leaders equate succession planning to retirement planning. However, smart church leaders realize that succession planning is much more than that.

I visited with my friend William Vanderbloemen who just wrote a book on the subject called Next: Pastoral Succession That Works, which is a church leader’s comprehensive guidebook to understanding what you can do now to prepare for the day your church faces a leadership transition.

Brad: Why is pastoral succession such an important issue for churches right now?

William: The big idea that drove writing this book was a single sentence I realized a few years ago: Every pastor is an interim pastor. Few pastors consider this truth, but unless they plan on leading their church after Jesus’ return, everyone in ministry will face the day when a successor takes over their church. But once you consider the inevitability of transition, and the chance a leader has to secure a legacy through a good succession, it quickly becomes the issue that smart leaders obsess over, no matter their age or stage of career.

Brad: I know many people equate succession planning with retirement planning. Is that really what succession planning is?

William: Not at all. Retirement is often only a final step in a series of pastoral successions. We found in our study that the average pastor will transition about three times in their career. Each of those transitions warrants a plan. Succession is when one senior leader intentionally transitions and hands over leadership to another. It is creating a plan for what will happen within the organization once you need a new leader, which every organization will face. Smart leaders realize that succession planning should start with pastors early in their tenure at their church. While retirement planning should be part of a healthy succession plan, a true succession plan encompasses a plan for any leadership transition reason, whether it is the pastor’s own decision, the board’s, or an unfortunate emergency situation.

Brad: What should young leaders, early on in their tenure, be thinking about now to start planning a successful succession?

William: When I was a young pastor, John Maxwell told me, “William, spend your younger years creating options for your later years.” I believe that more now than ever. The sooner you start laying out a succession plan, the more options you create for your future.

I’d particularly point young leaders to Chapter 2 of Next. It lays out “The Ten Commandments of Succession Planning,” which is a checklist of steps that young leaders need to be doing now to prepare themselves and their church for a successful leadership transition.

One of those steps is setting a healthy pace for the long run by establishing regular sabbaticals and being part of an accountability group. Too many successions happen on the heels of a moral or financial failure because the pastors were tired and didn’t have anyone to talk to about their personal fatigue.

Another step is that church leaders need to prepare an emergency envelope for what would happen if an emergency happened and the pastor couldn’t fill the pulpit on Sunday.

Check out chapter 2 of the book for all ten steps of what you should be doing now to prepare your succession plan.

Brad: Tell me more about the hundreds of interviews you and your co-author Warren Bird from Leadership Network did for research on the book. What was the most surprising trend you found?

William: Great question, Brad. It’s one that I’m asked quite a bit. There are a whole lot of surprises that we found, but two trends come to mind. First, I never realized how much of a good succession rises and falls on the outgoing pastor’s spouse. There are a number of great stories in the book that highlight this. Smart churches will pay attention to that dynamic and find ways to address it as they face transitions.

Secondly, I was shocked to see the average ages of the pastors of the largest churches in the country. There are some great infographics and tables in the book with that sort of information. Seeing it laid out in one spot convinced me that succession planning is a looming crisis for the church.

Thanks, William! This is a topic that every leader needs to start thinking, talking, even obsessing about. Thank you for sharing your wisdom with us.

Order Next: Pastoral Succession That Works now at NextPastor.com for you, your church staff, and your church board.

Young Influencers List, August edition

Here you go, the August edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all the past month’s lists here.

1. Andy Mineo- NYC based hip hop artist, songwriter, producer and performer; part of the Reach Records family.

2. Heather Stevens- co-leader of “The Church and It’s 20 Somethings” project. And daughter of Tim Stevens…!!

3. Jerry Shen- co-founder of ELEO Conference, entrepreneur, creator of Fantasy Monster, and director of Engineering for Yahoo Fantasy Sports.

4. Thomas Lake- Atlanta based senior writer for Sports Illustrated.

5. Jeff Shaw- director of Out of Darkness, an anti human trafficking ministry, part of the Atlanta Dream Center.

6. Erika Kraus- founder of Haiti Transformed, and relief and development director at Antioch Community Church in Waco, TX, as well as Acts of Mercy International.

7. Brooklyn Lindsey- youth speaker, author, and youth/Saturday night campus pastor at Highland Park Church in Lakeland, FL

12 Churches under the Radar you should Know

Here are a few churches with lots of influence in their communities, and definitely worth checking out in terms of the way they are doing ministry and reaching their cities. But may not be as well known to other leaders around the country.

Check them out, and add any other churches to the comments section that might be under the radar but we should make sure and know about.

1. Reality Church- San Francisco; Dave Lomas

2. Fresh Life ChurchKalispell, MT; Levi Lusko

3. Cornerstone Church- Orangeburg, SC; Artie Davis

4. The Crossing Church- Las Vegas, NV; Shane Philip

5. South Bay ChurchSan Jose, CA; Andy Wood

6. The Church of Eleven22- Jacksonville, FL; Joby Martin

7. The Church at ArkansasFayetteville, AR; Jonathan Beasley

8. Liquid Church- Mountainside, NJ; Tim Lucas

9. Epiphany Fellowship Church- Philadelphia, PA; Eric Mason

10. Hillside Community Church- Rancho Cucamonga, CA; Aaron McRae

11. The Triumphant Church- Hyattsville, MD; Perrin Rogers

12. Substance Church- Minneapolis, MN; Peter Haas

 

6 Ways to Lead Staff You Don’t Like :: Guest Post

in Catalyst,Friends and Links,leadership,Leadership Rules. 2 Comments

Todd Adkins is the Director of Leadership at LifeWay, and heads up the Ministry Grid team. Todd’s goal, with the rest of the Ministry Grid team, is to provide churches a tool to assist them in training leaders and volunteers at every level from the parking lot to the pulpit.

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6 Ways To Lead Staff You Don’t Like

Some of you will be deeply offended and leave this post right after the next sentence. While you should love everyone on your staff, it’s ok if you like some people more.

In fact, its important for you to realize that you are eventually going to end up with someone on your team that you don’t really like. I am not talking about someone who is downright toxic to your culture, those people should be removed from your organization. I am speaking of someone who adds value to your work and team but there’s something about their personality that rubs you the wrong way.

When push comes to shove you are a leader and you are going to have make some adjustments so that your team can continue to function at a high level.

Here are six ways you can lead staff members you don’t like.

1. First, identify what is YOUR problem?

If their performance is satisfactory this is really your issue after all. You owe it to yourself and to them to take a good hard look at what it is that you find so irritating. Are they too negative, too obsessed with a hobby, or they are too aggressive?  Is it something superficial? While you cant change a staff members personality, mannerisms, or modus operandi you can choose to change your attitude and how you interact with them. If you don’t it is only a matter of time before it becomes apparent to them or the rest of your team.

2. You don’t have to be personal friends with all of your staff.

There is a natural expectation of separation between work life and personal life in the business world but the lines are much more fuzzy in the church. The smaller the staff the fuzzier it gets. Be sure you manage expectations and establish healthy boundaries when bringing new people on board.

3. Be professional and courteous with them.

The key here is to remembering to be professional and treat them how you would want to be treated.  Take a genuine interest in them and margin time for them. Make a conscious effort to engage them in conversation about their life outside of the organization.

4. Knock out a big project shoulder to shoulder.

It gets much harder not to like somebody if you have worked hard side by side to achieve something great. I would also remind you that taking on something particularly difficult together can have an even greater effect.  This is much more risky, however, as pressure may also further exacerbate the problem.

5. Don’t make them an inside joke.

If this person has a quirk, mannerism, habit, etc. that is bothersome or downright annoying do not share it with other employees. Just because its funny doesn’t mean you have to share it. It is not funny and will ultimately undermine your leadership with your team. If you have a team like mine there are no holds barred and everyone and everything is fair game…but that’s another post.

6. Focus on their value to the team.

At the end of the day, you have obviously already decided that this employee is adding enough value to keep around so focus on what makes them so valuable to the team.

 

Todd Adkins is the Director of Leadership at Lifeway Christian Resources. He is passionate about the development of leaders, especially within the church. Todd served in student ministry and as an executive pastor for several years before joining the leadership at Lifeway to head up Ministry Grid, Lifeway’s dynamic new leadership development platform featuring over 3,700 videos and a fully customizable learning management system for churches. Todd’s goal, with the rest of the Ministry Grid team, is to provide churches a tool to assist them in training leaders and volunteers at every level from the parking lot to the pulpit. You can follow him on Twitter @ToddAdkins.

Young Influencers List, July Edition

Here you go, a brand new July edition of the YOUNG INFLUENCERS LIST. You can see all the past months lists here.

1. Sarah Dubbeldam – owner and Editor in chief of Darling Magazine, a great lifestyle magazine for women.

2. Charles Best - former public school teacher, now founder and CEO of Donors Choose, an innovative and revolutionary charity focused on teachers and schools.

3. Roxanne Stone – VP of Publishing at the Barna Group, former editorial director at Relevant Magazine.

4. Ben Prescott - campus pastor of Free Chapel Orange County, and formerly with PlanetShakers in Australia.

5. Christena Cleveland – speaker, writer, reconciliation expert, social psychologist, and author of Disunity in Christ.

6. Gareth Gilkeson and Ali Gilkeson – married front man and front woman, leading the Northern Ireland worship band Rend Collective, and transplants to Atlanta!

Young Influencers List, June Edition

Here you go, the June Edition of the Young Influencers List. You can see all of the past month’s lists here.

 

1. Dawn Chere Wilkerson- worship leader, co-pastor of The Vous in Miami, co-founder of Vous Conference, and wife to the crazy Rich Wilkerson Jr.

2. CJ Casciotta- artist, designer, social innovator, and CEO of Cardboard, a brand consultancy firm in Orange County, CA.

3. Marty Santiago- 1/2 of the up and coming Social Club band, a hip hop, rap, spoken word duo out of Miami and NYC.

4. Jenny Eaton Dyer- author, speaker, justice expert, and executive director of Hope Through Healing Hands in Nashville.

5. Gregory Spencer- East Africa Managing Director and communications/marketing lead for The Paradigm Project, and recently named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 List.

6. for King and Country- Australian born pop music duo made up of Joel and Luke Smallbone.

7. Daniel Sturridge- professional soccer player for Liverpool and the England national team.

Young Influencers List, May edition

Here you go, the May edition of the Young Influencers List. You can also see all the past month’s lists here.

1. Rhett Lashlee- offensive coordinator and quarterback coach for the Auburn Tigers.

2. Ben Houston- recent Australian transplant to the city of angels as lead pastor of Hillsong LA.

3. Bethany Haley- co-founder and executive director of Exile International, working in Uganda to transform former child soldiers into community leaders.

4. Greg Jennings- pro bowl wide receiver for the Minnesota Vikings, formerly with the Green Bay Packers (and Super Bowl Champion).

5. Beth Schmidt- founder and executive director of Wishbone, allowing at risk inner city students to crowd source donors for funding their education; recently on Forbes 30 under 30 list.

6. Lou Yeoh- director of FrogAsia.working to improve education in Malaysia.

7. Jonas Myrin- Grammy winning songwriter and artist from Sweden.