12 Churches under the Radar you should Know

Here are a few churches with lots of influence in their communities, and definitely worth checking out in terms of the way they are doing ministry and reaching their cities. But may not be as well known to other leaders around the country.

Check them out, and add any other churches to the comments section that might be under the radar but we should make sure and know about.

1. Reality Church- San Francisco; Dave Lomas

2. Fresh Life ChurchKalispell, MT; Levi Lusko

3. Cornerstone Church- Orangeburg, SC; Artie Davis

4. The Crossing Church- Las Vegas, NV; Shane Philip

5. South Bay ChurchSan Jose, CA; Andy Wood

6. The Church of Eleven22- Jacksonville, FL; Joby Martin

7. The Church at ArkansasFayetteville, AR; Jonathan Beasley

8. Liquid Church- Mountainside, NJ; Tim Lucas

9. Epiphany Fellowship Church- Philadelphia, PA; Eric Mason

10. Hillside Community Church- Rancho Cucamonga, CA; Aaron McRae

11. The Triumphant Church- Hyattsville, MD; Perrin Rogers

12. Substance Church- Minneapolis, MN; Peter Haas

 

The Catalyst Leader is $2.99 Today ONLY: Thursday, July 3

Hey friends!

Today only- The Catalyst Leader book Kindle version is available for $2.99 on Amazon.

Go Get it NOW!

Again, today only- THURSDAY, JULY 3. The Catalyst Leader Kindle version is $2.99 on Amazon.

Buy one for yourself and one for a friend to pass on.

And if you’ve already read the book, then please buy 2 copies of the Kindle version for your friends/family.

This is such a great deal!

Thanks for the support! And thanks to our friends at Amazon for making this possible.

 

New Stuff Wednesday

Here are some new things you need to know about and go get!

1. Take it All – brand new worship album from Passion

2. Diamonds- brand new music album from JohnnySwim

3. Crimson Cord- brand new hip hop/spoken word/rap album from Propaganda

4. You Make Me Brave- brand new worship album from Bethel Music

5. All Sons and Daughters- new worship album from All Sons and Daughters 

6. Home Behind the Sun- brand new book from Jason Locy and Tim Willard

7. Moment Maker- new book from Carlos Whittaker 

8. The Art of Celebration- fairly new worship album from Rend Collective

9. The Worship Initiative, Vol 1- brand new worship album from Shane and Shane

 

Interview with Jason Locy and Tim Willard about Home Behind the Sun

 

I’m excited today to post an interview with two friends, Jason Locy and Tim Willard. Both guys have been involved in the Catalyst community for over 10 years now working on our Catalyst Leadership Groupzine project along with other initiatives.

In 2011 they wrote a book entitled Veneer: Living Deeply in a Surface Society that I said, “every leader needs to read.”

They have a new book out this past week, Home Behind the Sun: Connect with God in the Brilliance of the Everyday, in which they weave personal narrative and experiences into a wonderful topic: beauty in the everyday.

Jason and Tim are long-time and life-long friends and I can’t wait for leaders to read this book and to share it with others.

 

Brad: How should leaders interact with this book?

Jason: We intentionally wrote the book to be an introspective read and then added a discussion guide so that growing and learning could happen first individually and then in community. That way the applications are contextualized based on your environment and past experiences.

We think leaders grow by being around other people in deep conversations. So what we wanted to do was to give you, the leader-reader, deep conversation rather than a book of “how-tos” and bullet points.

Tim: We wanted to give the leader a book that didn’t explain how to do something, like confront unforgiveness in their heart, but a resource that would actually speak to that specific felt need. Our good friend Adam pastors a church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and he is going through the book with his staff. His comment was: “This book doesn’t tell me how to grow closer to God, it actually helps me do that.”

That blew us away, but we’re finding that’s how leaders are using it.

Click here for a sample of the Discussion Guide

 

Brad: Home Behind The Sun seems like a book that would be great for someone who doesn’t have a lot of time to sit down and read an entire book. They could just pick it up and read any given chapter and still receive a timely message. Was this intentional?

Tim: Absolutely. Our favorite books are the ones we return to often. And that’s what we wanted this one to be. Much of the book is broken up into personal narratives regarding the brilliance in the everyday grind of work, relationships, parenting–even in despair and tragedy. We know time is precious to folks and we thought offering a book that didn’t carry the pressure of working through the entire thing would be a welcome change for readers, especially ministry leaders who are inundated with books they’re told to read.

Jason: Yeah, Tim and I get it. I have a 9-to-5 job and Tim’s studying for his doctorate. We understand that time slips away easily. With Home Behind the Sun, you can pick it up with a morning cup of coffee or evening tea and read a bit, and think on it using the discussion guide in the back of the book.

 

Brad: In the book, you talk a lot about your roles as fathers and husbands. How will this book impact men of faith like yourselves?

Jason: Hopefully it will hit them over the head and knock them down. Ha. I guess I’m only half-kidding. But seriously, we’re passionate for men to come away a good challenge. After reading they might say, “Wow, my view of masculinity is based on sitcom realities. But these guys (Tim and I) are presenting manhood in a different way.”

Because of the way its written, because its written by two guys, because it peppers in experiences with our own sons and daughters, we think it will start to reclaim men’s imaginations on what it looks like to be a dad, a husband, a friend, and a man.

Tim: But even though it’s written by two men, and men will learn from it by our experiences, it wasn’t written specifically for men at all. In fact, we look into the beauty of innocence, the complexity and need for deep relationships and universal topics like that that aren’t specific to men. So we think there’s something for men and women to wrestle with and even enjoy.

 

Brad: What do you hope leaders will get out the book?

Tim: I really hope leaders will find this book to be an aid to their spiritual refreshment. I think so often the “leader type books” are the ones that explain how to do something. I hope the leader will see this book as one he or she can sit with in the quiet of their homes or apartments and allow the thoughts to minister to their hearts.

So often we don’t know we’ve been running a hundred miles an hour until we sit and listen. Sometimes it’s a song, other times it’s a friend speaking truth to us. I hope this book can be kind of both–a song of encouragement and encouragement from to brothers-in-Christ.

Jason: I would agree with Tim, but also add that I work with a lot of entrepreneurs and ministry leaders and so often I hear about burnout and tiredness and priorities out of whack. We’ve all been there, and for me, this book is a pause and a reminder, that we are leaders who possess the glory of Christ within us. And when we come to terms with that truth, it will affect our spiritual lives for sure, but it will also impact the way we lead others. At the end of the day I hope leaders receive refreshment as they flip the pages and plenty of great conversation with friends as they work through what they are reading.

12 Tips to Help You be a Better Speaker and Communicator

1. End on time. So simple, but so hard for so many speakers I know.

2. Don’t ask if people can hear you. They can. And if they can’t, the sound guys will turn up your microphone. This is incredibly distractive.

3. Avoid open ended questions with your audience. Those can be incredibly awkward if no one responds. For example, “are you fired up?” If no one answers, or even one person, you’re off to an awkward start!

4. Always thank your host or sponsor. It creates connection, and also shows that you are actually aware enough to know who’s behind the event or gathering you’re part of.

5. Make room for questions. Not always an option, but anytime you can create a conversation with those you are speaking to, that’s a good thing.

6. Don’t read your slides. I can read your slide. You don’t need to.

7. Never throw the production or front of house or audio team under the bus. This is a cardinal rule.

8. Tell stories. Be personable. Stories create connection and vulnerability. Stories fill in the gap between you as the expert and everyone else as the wanna bee’s.

9. Be authentic. If you aren’t funny, don’t try to be. Be real and who you truly are. Approachability is crucial.

10. Always have a call to action. Leave those in attendance with something to go work on. The point is to Change and Do Something!

11. Look people in the eye. Whether it’s 10 people or 10,000 people, eye contact is imperative.

12. Be passionate. Your level of passion will give permission to the audience to lean in with you. Move towards Heart and soul, and emotional intelligence. Leave it all on the field! Make sure you create emotional hooks, and take people on a roller coaster instead of a train when it comes to passion level. Trains are good for sleeping on….!

30 Key Movements happening in the Christian community

A lot of leaders ask me what “movements” or networks within the Christian community they should pay attention to.

Here are 30 of those, in no particular order of importance or priority. These aren’t the only 30, but 30 I think you should be aware of.

Feel free to add others we should have on the radar in the comments section.

1. Hillsong

2. Passion

3. Catalyst

4. Jesus Culture

5. Exponential

6. Worship Central (London)

7. Verge/Austin Stone

8. Q

9. IF Gathering

10. Reach Records/Lecrae

11. Leadership Summit/Willow Creek

12. Misfit/Christ Tabernacle

13. Compassion

14. Orange

15. North Point Ministries/Drive Conference

16. LifeChurch.tv

17. ARC

18. Resurgence

19. FPU/Dave Ramsey

20. Rick Warren/Saddleback/PEACE

21. Gospel Coalition

22. HTB/Alpha Course

23. Leadership Network

24. Thrive Conference/Bayside Church

25. Luis Palau Association

26. Women of Faith

27. Send North America

28. The Bible Series/Son of God Movie/Mark Burnett and Roma Downey

29. Relevant Magazine/Media Group

30. PlanetShakers

 

 

 

12 New Books You Should Read

in Favorite New Things,Friends and Links,leadership,publishing. 2 Comments

Here are 12 new books I recommend, in no particular order:

1. The Locus Effect- by Gary Haugen, president and CEO of International Justice Mission

2. The Truest Thing About You- by Dave Lomas, pastor of Reality San Franciso

3. Leaders Eat Lastby Simon Sinek, author, speaker, and thought leader (speaking at Catalyst West in April)

4. The God of Yes- by Jud Wilhite, pastor of Central Christian Church in Las Vegas

5. Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook- by Gary Vaynerchuk, speaker, entrepreneur, and founder of Wine Library TV

6. Crash the Chatterbox- by Steven Furtick, pastor of Elevation Church in Charlotte

7. Clout- by Jenni Catron, blogger, author and pastor at Menlo Park Presbyterian Church in Menlo Park, CA

8. Fight- by Craig Groeschel, senior pastor of LifeChurch.tv in Oklahoma City, OK

9. Beating Burnout- by Anne Marie Miller, author, speaker and blogger.

10. Flesh- by Hugh Halter, author, pastor, speaker, and missional church specialist

11. Passion- by Louie Giglio, pastor of Passion City Church and founder of Passion Conferences

12. Restless- by Jennie Allen, speaker, author and founder of IF Gathering

Interview with Andy Stanley on How to Be Rich

I’m really excited about How to Be Rich, the latest book from my friend Andy Stanley. As you know, Andy is senior pastor of North Point Community Church and founder of North Point Ministries, which arguably is one of the most influential churches and christian ministries in the world. Andy is a leadership guru, but also drops wisdom consistently on a number of other topics, including the issue of generosity, wealth, finances, and stewardship.

This book is timely, strategic, challenging, and a wake up call to the American Church and Christian leaders everywhere, especially here in the US. I highly recommend this book, both for you as well as your entire team and staff.

Andy recently took some time to answer a few questions regarding the book.

 

1) You talk about how almost everyone who reads this book will be rich in comparison to the rest of the world, but given that many people are legitimately struggling in America these days, is there a risk in overstating how “rich” much of the country actually is, despite being the largest economy?

First, if you are able to buy, or consider buying, my book with your own money, you are much further ahead of the financial game than you might imagine. And even if you cannot, at some point in your life, you might be at that point. However, I am convinced that many of us get caught in the trap of thinking we aren’t rich by playing the comparison game. In our minds, rich is always the other person, the other family. Rich is having more than you currently have. If that is the case, you can be rich and not feel it. You can be rich and not know it. And that is a problem. That’s why I wrote this book.

We know a lot of people who are rich, but know far fewer people who are good at being rich.  So, whether you are rich now, or one day your turn out to be, I’d like you to know how to be rich. That is why I feel everyone needs this book.

 

2) In your opinion, has the evangelical church in America failed to see the strong connection between how we spend our money and our spiritual lives? If so, why?

I think the connection many of us have failed to see is where trusting in our money leads us. The apostle Paul warned his protégé Timothy about a tendency for rich people: a natural inclination for your hope to migrate to money. And if you fall into this trap, the wealthier you get, the more you will hope in riches. Rich people have the potential to reach a point where they see money as the source of their safety and security. 

The way to offset this side effect of wealth is to put our hope in God. We’ve all met people like this. There are some rich people who, no matter how much God sends their way, never seem to put their hope in their riches. An amazing thing can be observed within this group of rich people. Since their hope is in the Lord, they never seem to suffer from another side effect of wealth that Paul mentions: arrogance. Despite being rich, they’re humble and generous at heart.

So where we place our hope and trust is a pretty good indicator of our spiritual life. Where is your hope – God, or money?

 

3) Jesus begins his ministry by proclaiming good news to the poor, but is your sense that Jesus’ advocacy for the poor and his suspicion of wealth (“it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven”) is more difficult to preach in a society like the U.S.? Are these biblical themes of helping the poor, and the danger of wealth, “hidden in plain sight” for many?

No matter where you stand on the economy, we live in the richest time of the richest nation in history. In fact, if you can read this interview, you’re automatically rich by global standards. And it’s not just because you can read and have access to books, but because you’ve been given individual freedom to do so, not to mention the time.

What we call “poverty” today would have been considered middle class just a few generations ago. In 2000, the average “poor” family had goods and services rivaling middle-class families of the 1970’s. In addition, most poor families don’t stay poor. Over the sixteen-year period tracked by one study, 95% of the families in the lowest income quintile climbed the economic ladder to higher quintiles. As Michael Cox, an economist with the Federal Reserve, noted, “The rich may have gotten a little richer, but the poor have gotten much richer.”

So my purpose in writing this book is to help rich Jesus followers get better at being rich. Even if we’re not convinced we’re rich, we all probably hope to be. And should we ever admit that we have, in fact, crossed that imaginary line, I want us to be good at it. After all, most rich people aren’t.

 

4) Can you talk about how cultivating a life of generosity helps not just society but also the giver? What spiritual principles are at work when we give generously?

No matter how rich or poor you might feel, right now is the time to be generous. As counterintuitive as it seems, generosity begins wherever you are. It is important to make generosity a priority. There’s a tendency to think that generosity is for when you have extra money, when you’re rich. And as I say in How to Be Rich, you probably don’t think you’re rich. And since you’re not rich, why would you give away what little you have?

However, when you make giving a priority, something happens inside of you. Especially when it’s financially challenging to do so. It’s like you loosen your grip on a value system whose motto says, “Money is the key to life and happiness and safety.” In that split second, you reject that way of thinking for one that says, “My hope is not in riches but in him who richly provides.” And suddenly, your eyes begin to open to a value system that can’t be measured by dollars.

In addition, generosity helps us cultivate awareness of things that really matter. Opportunities that make a real difference in the world. Things that matter to our heavenly Father. It takes no discipline or effort on our part to be made aware of what we don’t have but could have. But it takes initiative to become and remain aware of what other people don’t but should have. Generosity helps us make a concerted effort to keep the needs of others in the forefront of our thinking. Not for guilt’s sake, but for the sake of being good stewards of the resources we have been privileged to manage.

 

5) How does a church – or a person – make giving a way of life, and not just another book, sermon series, church fad or well-intentioned but short-lived spiritual diet?

When you take everything Jesus taught about being generous and distill it down, three common themes emerge. There may be more than that, but these three ideas gives us a great picture of what it looks like to be generous and to make it habitual.

Generosity won’t happen unless you make it a priority. The best way to make giving a priority is to make it the very first check you write every month. Before the mortgage. Before groceries or clothing. Before saving. Whatever the amount, do it first. The minute you deposit your paycheck. This not only ensures that you’ll guard it as a priority, but it’s a symbolic way of reminding you where your hope lies.

Not only do we need to make generosity a priority, we need to base it off percentages. If you want to guard against the side effects of wealth, you can’t evaluate your giving in terms of dollars. Percentages give you a much better reflection of whether you have control of your money or your money has control of you. So what percentage should you give? I tell people to start with 10 percent because the Bible writers have a lot to say about the tithe, which means, “tenth.” For some people, that’s extremely uncomfortable. But so is a colonoscopy, and those save countless lives. It just depends on how badly you want to protect yourself from the side effects of wealth. Remember, it’s not just a way to be “good.” It’s a preventative. The most important thing is to start somewhere. Even if it’s just 1 percent.

A third leverage point for lasting change in generosity is progressive giving. To be progressive simply means that over time you raise the percentage. As your financial situation changes throughout life, change your giving percentage along with it. When you make that initial adjustment to giving 10 percent, it soon becomes comfortable. And while financial comfort is generally a good thing, it can also make you more vulnerable to the side effects of wealth. If you’ve been giving the same percentage for most of your life, consider raising it. Life is not stagnant. It’s progressive in nature. And your giving should be progressive too.

 

6) Can you talk about how Western and American society – and possibly even the church itself – has encouraged a consumerist mentality that makes radical generosity a concept that many people will find especially difficult?

Gallup conducted a poll to see how different socioeconomic groups defined “rich.” Not surprisingly, everybody had a different definition – and nobody thought he fit it. For each and every person, “rich” was roughly double the amount possessed by the person defining it. “Rich” is a moving target. No matter how much money we have or make, we will probably never consider ourselves rich. The biggest challenge facing rich people is that they’ve lost they‘re ability to recognize that they’re rich.

We all feel we need more. Appetites have only one word in their vocabulary – MORE. Appetites are never fully and finally satisfied. Even after the most satisfying meal imaginable, we eventually find ourselves rummaging through the pantry for a snack.

Appetites aren’t bad things. I believe God created them. I also believe sin distorted them. Appetites bring zest and passion to life. But they are terrible filters for making decisions. I don’t think it is an exaggeration to say that your responses to your appetites will determine the direction and quality of your life.

So, while generosity may be the antidote for the dizzying effects of wealth, your appetite for more may function as an antidote against God-honoring generosity. Your appetite for more stuff, status, and security has the potential to quash your efforts to be generous. And that’s a problem.

If you feed an appetite, it grows. Satisfying an appetite does not diminish it. It expands it. To diminish an appetite, you have to starve it. So, in the early days of marriage, when none of us have a lot of extra money to do extra things, we don’t do extra things. And we were content. We were forced to starve that appetite. But once our incomes and our purchasing power began to increase, we started feeding that ugly beast. In doing so, we gave up a slice of contentment. And so it goes.

So, to answer the question, sin encourages the consumerist mentality and generosity is the antidote.

 

7) Is your teaching on this subject part of a bigger trend in American evangelicalism of increasingly preaching not just a message of personal conversion, but also a message of social renewal, one that had perhaps been, many years earlier, ceded to mainline or more theologically liberal churches but is now being reclaimed?

I’m not a philanthropist. While I care about the poor, the issue of local or global poverty doesn’t keep me up at night. I’m concerned about the plight of children. But I’m not on a mission to get all the available orphans in the world adopted into Christian homes. Though, like you, I sure wish they could be. My passion, and a major reason I want to get this message into people’s hands, is my concern for the reputation and cultural positioning of the local church. I want people to help me reanchor the church to undeniable, mind-boggling, culture-shifting demonstration of compassion and generosity. Because, generosity was the hallmark of the early church. They did for those who could not do or would not do anything in return. That was new. That got people’s attention. Eventually, it shifted and shaped the moral conscience of the West.

 

8.) What sparked your interest in initially teaching on this topic?

While this is a new publication for me, this is a not a new message for me. Every fall for the past seven years, I’ve stood in front of our Atlanta-area churches and told them they are a bunch of haves who act like have-nots and that God and I aren’t happy about it! Okay, that’s not exactly how I phrased it. But when it comes to this particular topic, I’ve been known to be uncomfortably bold.

Our churches’ journey began with a message series I preached in 2007 entitled How to Be Rich. Two things prompted the series. First, our culture’s incessant messages about how to get rich when, in fact, most of us got rich a long time ago and nobody told us. Second, Paul’s instructions to Timothy regarding how rich Christians are to behave. After studying the passage, I was left with the realization that a lot of Christians are not very good at being rich. Then it dawned on me: Well of course they’re not! Nobody has taught them how! So for four weekends I navigated our congregation through the terms and conditions of Paul’s instructions to rich people.

 

9) Describe what happened with your congregations in Atlanta when you preached a sermon series on this very topic. How did a $1.5 million goal turn into more than $5 million raised? What kind of transformation did this have on the beneficiaries of the money, and also on the donors themselves – the members of your church?

In the fall of 2012, I challenged our churches to give $1.5 million toward our Be Rich giving initiative. They gave $5.2 million. In a week. And we in turn gave 100% of it away. No shipping and handling costs. No overhead or operating expenses. No expensive vacations for the pastor and his family. We gave it all away. In addition, our congregants provided 34,000 volunteer hours to local charities that are volunteer dependent. And if that weren’t enough, we collected 20,332 Operation Christmas Child shoeboxes for Samaritan’s Purse – the largest collection they’ve ever received from a local church.

I visited our international partner in San Salvador, La Casa de Mi Padre, a group home for children who can’t live with their families for a variety of heartbreaking reasons. The executive director picked us up from the airport and asked if we liked his truck. Before I could answer, he smiled and said, “It’s a Be Rich truck. Thank you.” While visiting the children’s home, I was introduced to their newest employee, a licensed marriage and family counselor, a position they desperately needed as they seek to reconnect children with their families. As we left her office, we were reminded by the executive director that she was only there because of Be Rich.

 

10) What would you like Christianity to be known for in the U.S., and what do you think it’s currently known for in America? How might this book play into that?

Generosity changed the world once. What would happen if the church became known for inexplicable generosity once again? The generosity poured out by the members of our churches continues to overflow our community and extend around the world. They embody the brand of generosity we’re called to extend to others.

Generosity continues to capture the attention of people from all over the world. To this day, it’s a reflection of the love Jesus demonstrated. It send a message to the world that God so loved that he gave – and there were no strings attached. The best ministry we can offer on God’s behalf isn’t to explain our theology. It’s to extend our generosity. Because that’s what our heavenly Father did for us. And that’s what he’s asked us to do as well.

 

Thanks Andy!

Again, I highly recommend this book! To purchase the book, go here.