Just Lead!, a new book for Women Leaders

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A Brand New Resource for Women Leaders!

I am frequently asked questions about the development of women leaders.  While the opportunities for leadership are increasing for women, the resources for development still many times seems inadequate.  That’s why I am really excited for the release of Just Lead! A No Whining, No Complaining, No Nonsense Practical Guide for Women Leaders in the Church written by my friends Jenni Catron and Sherry Surratt.

Jenni is the Executive Director of Cross Point Church in Nashville, TN, where she leads the staff and oversees the ministry of five campuses, and Sherry is the president and CEO of MOPS International.

As two experienced leaders who have served in a number of capacities in churches and organizations, Sherry and Jenni not only explore barriers – internal and external – that keep women from assuming a leadership role but also provide practical reality checks on what women can do to become effective leaders.  The book shows how to handle criticism, face indecision, and grapple with the loneliness that often comes with being in charge.  It also offers sage advice on respecting gender differences, overcoming communication barriers, leading other women, and developing a balanced team.

If you are a woman who wants to successfully navigate the transitions necessary to lead well in church and ministry settings, Just Lead! is the handbook you need.

Here are 5 Questions with Jenni & Sherry:

1. What is one leadership lesson you wish you had learned earlier in life?

We wish we had learned the significance of seizing your present sphere of influence and pouring your best into it.  We often say, “Wherever you lead, lead well.”  For those of us with the gift of leadership, we’re naturally inclined to aspire to bigger spheres of influence.  But in doing so, we often miss the leadership lessons we need to be learning in our present circumstances.  Leadership is a journey that doesn’t have a final destination.  You have to make the most of every stop along the way.

2. What three issues do you most commonly see hinder leaders from leading well?

Most of us deal with varying degrees of fear and insecurity, but a few additional issues we see leaders commonly wrestle with are indecision, criticism and communication.

  • Leaders have to be decision makers but oftentimes we become paralyzed by the complexities we face and are indecisive.
  • Criticism is constant.  It’s a natural part of leadership.  Learning to discern what to grow from and what to discard is essential.
  • Leadership rises or falls on communication.  It’s one of the greatest tools we need to develop to lead well.

3. What do men and women need to understand about leading better together?

Trust and respect each other.  Make it less about gender and more about how our gifts and abilities complement each other to do the work we’re called to do.  Seek to understand and give lots of grace!

4. What advice do you have for young leaders?

Wherever God puts you, ask Him for wisdom and a humble spirit to approach your leadership opportunities.  Bring your best game to the table with faithfulness and a willing attitude.  Be the best leader you can be, even if your leadership opportunity is small.  Seize every opportunity to grow and lead with excellence and courage.

5. What inspired you to write a book for women leaders?

Since the day we met, we have shared a deep love for encouraging other women leaders.  We both are frequently sought out for conversations about how to lead well as women.  What we discovered was that there were very few resources available for us to recommend to help women navigate some of the unique challenges they face.  This book was a way to put our stories on paper.  It’s what we would share if we could sit down one-on-one with each of them.

 

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